Tag Archives: Cloud

Cloud

ScaleScale on the stack behind Netflix scaling

Over at ScaleScale, a blog about all the good stuff when it comes to scaling, an interesting post was published on the stack behind Netflix scaling. Since Netflix is quite public about how they operate, the post put was together with stuff from around the internet.

Stack Behind Netflix Scaling Like Spotify Netflix is kind of famous for creating and scaling their culture. This gives some important context to the culture to understand how they scale their software stack and why it works. If you are interested in scaleable platforms and full stack development check it out.

Lessons of product development at Netflix

Just a month after sharing my post on Spotify engineering culture, I found a post on Startup lessons from Netflix. That was written inspired by a talk on fast delivery devops by Adrian Cockcroft. Who spent a long time building up Netflix’s cloud infrastructure and spearheaded the development of many new cloud-related technologies and techniques at the company.

Adrian Cockcroft’s lessons of product development at Netflix

Adrian’s lessons of product development at Netflix are summarised in this sheet:
Lessons of product development at Netflix
Besides from the different angle and focus on cloud, I think that there is quite some overlap with the Spotify presentations. If you have a different take at this, please leave a comment or meet me at the LAC congres where I will be presenting on time-to-market vs architecture…

Research shows you probably don’t quite understand this blog

According to research by the The Global Language Monitor:

SOA continues its reign as most confusing acronym

The Global Language Monitor is a company that collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends in language usage worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. GLM is known for among others its list of High Tech buzzwords. Here is their top 5 of Tech Buzzwords of the Second Decade of the 21st century, thus far (2010, 2011 & 2012) everybody uses but don’t quite understand (with commentary):

  1. Big Data — Big Data is the biggest buzzword. It has been called the key to new waves of productivity growth, essential to the US place in global economics, and more. Now if only we could agree on exactly what this means and how we get there. (By the way, consider yottabytes: a quadrillion gigabytes. Hint: Just think a lotta bytes.)
  2. The Cloud — The Cloud, in various manifestations has been ranked No. 1 for 2008, No, 4 overall for the decade, and now as No. 2 for 2012. Still all very nebulous.
  3. The Next Big Thing — A cliche rendered nearly meaningless by the innumerable daily claims made by VCs, entrepreneurs, college drop-outs, etc. Actually, you can count the history of next big things on your fingers, and possibly toes.
  4. Social Discovery — Webster’s 1910 definition. “Consisting in union of mutual converse,” might be an excellent corporate strategy.
  5. Web 2.0 (3.0, and so on) — Ranked as the 1,000,000th English-language word in 2009, it just keeps morphing along.

The Most Confusing Tech Acronym of 2012: SOA (Solutions Oriented Architecture), continuing its Most Confusing Tech Acronym of the Decade reign.

Watch the Mashable video on this list:

Read the full version on The Global Language Monitor.

And a little on SOA

Despite all the effort by numerous people this also shows that it is hard to get a solid grasp of what SOA is. We showed that before by comparing some of the definitions on (web) services and processes. We might learn from this that it is even harder to have as we call it “the business” initiate SOA projects and programs. Even if together with the business we get a clear picture of the benefits of Service Oriented Architecture is, it remains a challenge to lead them through this stuff they don’t really understand. Feel free to share your experiences in the comments…

SOA Cloud Service Technology Symposium 2012 London

The world’s largest conference dedicated to SOA, cloud computing and service technology will have it’s 2012 version in London! Hosting the 5th SOA Symposium and the 4th International Cloud Computing Symposium on September 24-25. This brings the symposium back to Europe after last years visit to Brasilia, Brazil. The SOA Symposiums website has been rebranded to Service Tech Symposium.

There are several blog posts on previous editions of the SOA Symposium available in blogs. During this years event the following books will be launched:

  • Cloud Computing: Concepts & Technology
  • SOA with REST: Principles, Patterns & Constraints
  • Next Generation SOA: A Real-World Guide to Modern Service-Oriented Computing

Call for presentations

The 2012 program committee invites submissions on all topics related to SOA, cloud computing and service technologies. The primary tracks are:

  • Cloud Computing Architecture & Patterns
  • New SOA & Service-Orientation Practices & Models
  • Service Modeling & Analysis Techniques
  • Service Infrastructure & Virtualisation
  • Cloud-based Enterprise Architecture
  • Real World Case Studies
  • Service Engineering & Service Programming Techniques
  • Interactive Services & the Human Factor
  • New REST & Web Services Tools & Techniques

Additional information the 2012 SOA Symposium Call for Papers are available online. Download the Speaker Form. All submissions must be reviewed no later than July 15, 2012.

EM Cloud Administration Guide released

Oracle EM 12cOracle released the Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Administration Guide 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.1) documentation. It is part of the Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Documentation.

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control is system management software that delivers centralized monitoring, administration, and life-cycle management functionality for the complete IT infrastructure, including systems running Oracle and non-Oracle technologies.

Selected software development trends

About 2 months ago InfoWorld published 11 programming trends to watch. I’d like to share three with you since they are close to home for me:

  1. No code is an island
  2. Bandwidth is no longer free
  3. Energy is no longer free, either

No code is an island

Having worked in integration project for almost a decade the idea that there is little code living on an island is not strange to me. However InfoWorld points out that besides that more and more software developer are creating products to enhance other products

Our code is living increasingly in ecosystems. Many PHP programmers, for instance, create plug-ins for WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, or some other framework. Their code is a module that works with other modules.

The same goes for development for mobile devices that rely increasingly on modules or apps created by others, whether they run on the device or in the cloud. This increases the demand for stable interfaces and contracts. Besides that the requirements for availability and scalability will weigh in heavier.

An urge for lean programming

Or create programs that deliver value in an efficient way. New releases of software programmers tend to demand always more resources (just a small example). The cost of keeping a computer plugged in has never been an issue. It never mattered how much energy your rack of servers sucked down because the colo just sent you a flat bill for each box.

The Cloud trend tends to make cost more transparent. Some of the clouds — like Google App Engine or Amazon S3 (example) — don’t bill by the rack or root password. They charge for database commits and queries. This adds a new perspective for software developers. We might need to start thinking about the cost of each subroutine in euros, not in lines of code, function points or milliseconds of execution time.

On the consumer side more and more ISPs adding bandwidth caps and metering. To a software developer this means that optimizing bandwidth consumption when designing apps is becoming imperative. Besides the cost issue this will also be needed because of the customer experience (loading speed etc).

SOA, Cloud, and Semantic Web Technology talk

Earlier this month a talk by Thomas Erl (bestseller author on SOA and Cloud Computing) on SOA, Cloud Computing and Semantic Web technologies became available on the Arcitura Youtube channel. This talk gives a less than 30 minutes overview in how these work together. It has a focus on highlight promissing areas of synergy.

The definition used for Cloud Computing is:

Cloud computing is a specialized form of distributed computing that introduces utilization models for remotely provisioning scalable and measured IT resources.

The definition used for Semantic Web Technologies is:

Semantic Web Technologies represents a technology platform used to describe artifacts, their properties, and their relationships using machine-processable language.

SOA and Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing and Semantic Web technology


SOA Symposium 2011 Brasilia

SOA Cloud 2011 BrazilLater this month on the 27th and 28th of April the 4th International SOA Symposium and the 3th International Cloud Symposium will be for the first time held in Latin America – Brasilia, Brazil. More info on previous editions can be found on this blog. The 2011 SOA Symposium program consists of:

  • Expert Speaker Sessions
  • 10+ Conference Tracks
  • 4 Expert Panels
  • 4 Keynote Speeches

Given the location simultaneous translation (English-Portuguese-English) will be available in all technical sessions. For the complete agenda or resources from previous conference, check the site. Videos from the 2010 edition of the SOA Symposium can be found on InfoQ.

SOA Symposium 2010 videos available via InfoQ

This year, in partnership with InfoQ.com (the largest community site for technical architects), 1/4th of the SOA Symposium sessions was filmed and will be published on InfoQ. From early November InfoQ has started publishing these videos. At the time of writing the following videos are available:

Cloudy SOA

This session on Cloudy SOA by Mark Little covers:

an introduction to cloud computing pointing to the fact that the middleware needs of the cloud are similar to SOA’s, showing some of the benefits of running SOA along with the cloud, asking if cloud computing and SOA should evolve together and giving some future directions to consider.

BPM Top Seven Architectural Topics in 2010

Hanjo Normann’s session presenting the BPM Top Seven Architectural Topics in 2010 covers:

how to design a BPM/SOA solution including: modeling human interaction, improving BPM models, orchestrating composed services, central task management, new approaches for business-IT alignment, solutions for non-deterministic processes, and choreography.

Resurrecting SOA

Anne Thomas Manes in her Resurrecting SOA session goes into details on why she:

believes organizations need SOA more than before, but using a redefined SOA based on the SOA Manifesto, focusing on models, methodologies and patterns, not on technology, intended to produce the desired business and technical goals.

For a complete overview of SOA Symposium sessions on InfoQ check their SOA Symposium page.

Running SOA Suite on Amazon EC2

SOA Suite on EC2

SOA Suite on EC2


One of the things on my To Do list was to move my local SOA Suite 11g R1 to The Cloud. It seemed a good idea to save my laptop some resources (to spare some for JDeveloper) with only a limited investment. Besides that it can be a good way to demo applications, and work together with my colleagues on these demos.

During the last months I noticed that there are several good blogpost on the subject. In this post I’ll show you the ones I used and provide some additions to them.

Setting up Amazon Web Services (EC2 and S3)

This arcticle on OTN guided me while signing up for:

  • Amazon AWS
  • Amazon S3 – Simple Storage Service
  • Amazon EC2 – Elastic Compute Cloud

and to setup PuTTY. The only hick-up here was that I’m using the PortableApps version of PuTTY that doesn’t come with the puttygen – Key Generator.

Provisioning a SOA Server on Amazon EC2

This blogpost guided me in the provisioning of the AMI (Amazon Machine Image).

  • AMIs are per region: The Amazon Machine Instance (AMI) for SOA Suite (id = ami-acb557c5) is only available in the US East (Northern Virginia) Region.
  • Don’t bother to setup the Elastic Block Store (EBS) Volume. It is scripted in the latest version of the AMI, as described in step 5 of “SSH to your image and accept license”. The EBS Volume is seeded using a snapshot (id = snap-dd980db4) that is provided. This volume will be used to persist your data across sessions and AMI start/stop.
  • When launching the image (during the Configure Firewall step) set the SecurityGroup to accept HTTP traffic on port 7001 in case you want to use the SOA Suite from outside the Image.