Tag Archives: book

Book – Hatching Twitter: A True Story of

Book - Hatching Twitter: A true story of...Just finished reading Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal and I must say that I wasn’t as impressed as when reading for example The Everything Store. The book is more about politics and opportunities than about creating opportunities and value or generating great ideas that others can build on. Of course this can still offer a great story and be a good read, however it isn’t the thing I was looking for when picking up the book.

The two business lessons in Hatching Twitter: A true story of …

OK, I took two lessons from the book: The anecdote on the first starts when Evan Williams has the first appointment with his business coach. Evan asked his first question: “What’s the worst thing I can do as CEO to fuck the company up?

Without skipping a beat, Campbell responded: “Hire your fucking friends!” He went into a ten-minute tirade about friends and business and how they don’t mix.

Which was actually what Evan was doing at the time and kept doing.

Fake it until you make it

The second lessons boils down to “fake it until you make it”. To book quite extensively elaborates on how Jack Dorsey wasn’t just looking at Steve Jobs with admiration; he was emulating him. In public talks and news interviews Jack continued to channel Steve Jobs, using terms like “magical” and “delightful” and “surprising” and “best” to describe products, along with almost exact vernacular used by Steve Jobs at conferences and on television, including “we’re just humans running this company” and hawking the concept that Jobs shared, when he told people he was “most proud” of the things the company hadn’t done. That is how the world got to see Jack Dorsey as the new Steve Jobs. Which helped Jack advance in his plans to get back to Twitter and on with his career.

…and some parenting advice…

In one of the latest chapters when looking into the life of Evan Williams and his wife Sara there somehow pops up some parenting advice. It kind of surprised me from a founder of twitter:

…like Evan, Miles (his son) is shy and sometimes socially awkward. As much as they want to change that in him, they know they can’t. But they also know that technology won’t change that either, so the kids are strictly forbidden to use iPads, iPhones, or televisions. Human interactions are encouraged. So are physical, paper books.

Reading list of 2014 so far

In this blog post I’ll share a list of books I read during the first months of 2014. There is more business focus compared to previous years…

The everything store

The everything storeThe everything store is one of the books I liked reading most of my reading list this year. It tells the story of amazon.com so far; The vision and ways of working of the company and it’s founder Jeff Bezos.

The book gives a good insight into the ways amazon.com operates. There is a interesting review on that on The New York Review of Books. You should also read the reviews on amazon.com in which some of the staff reacts on the book. Find my separate post on the book – the everything store.

Mobile first

Mobile FirstMobile First is written by the former Yahoo! design architect, Luke Wroblewski. It is a to the point guide, with good examples. Though examples in this field quickly seem outdated they show the point very well.

The book offers both insightful design patterns and common-sense principles. In the end it all boils down to the adagium: keep it simple.

Automate this, How algorithms came to rule our world

Automate ThisMore and more parts of our lives are ruled by algorithms. There application isn’t only in the financial world or in automated systems inside companies, they are also in medical applications ranging from wait list prioritisation to assisting in diagnoses. The book is full of anecdotes, especially on high frequency trading. It also shows side affects liken how the war for talent has affected development and innovation of other innovations.
There is little room for the downside of algorithms creeping into our daily lives.

Hidden Persuation

Hidden PersuationGreat introduction into the ways in which we are influenced and how we can influence others. It details the psychology behind the techniques of influence described. The book offers very illustrative visual references. It is well created with a fine look-and-feel and an eye for detail.

Hidden persuasion is interesting for professionals in marketing, advertising and communications, but also if you’re just slightly interested in these fields. You will look in another way at (visual) communication in everyday life.

Lean, agile and Software development reading list of 2013

In this blogpost I’ll share a list of books I read during the first six months of 2013.

Hadoop – The definitive guide

Hadoop the definitive guideThis book proved very useful to get an introduction and solid background in Hadoop. I was reading it a little before starting an enhancement of MapReduce code. This made it possible to better understand the production code and how to make the changes.

Hadoop The Definitive Guide (amazon) is recommended for anyone interested in Hadoop stuff.

Essential scrum

Essential ScrumWanted to read Essential Scrum to renew and deepen my theoretical knowledge of Scrum. This is a great read for that purpose!

I like the visuals that are used and set it apart from other books on the subject. Besides that I liked the MindMap-like figures that support the stucture in the chapters.

The scope goes beyond the core of Scrum and does that well. It also touches on subjects like Multilevel and Portfolio planning, The role of managers in Scrum context, and Product Planning.

This is a great follow up read for anyone with basic Scrum training or certification. It doesn’t just offer the big picture but both details and examples on how to become more agile. It will help you deal with the complexities of implementing and refining Scrum.

Thinking Fast and Slow

Thinking Fast And SlowThe aim of Daniel Kahneman the author of Thinking Fast and Slow is to enrich the vocabulary of people talking at a watercooler, where opinions and gossip are exchanged. He wrote this book to influence the way they talk about judgements and choices of others. He has succeeded. As Economist has put it: Kahneman shows that we are not the paragons of reason we assume ourselves to be. When you realise this it put you and the world around you in a different perspective.

Mr. Kahneman is a person that understands like no other on the planet how and why we make the choices we make. He knows how to share his insights! This is a great read for any curious mind, escpecially those with an interest in how and why we make choices.

This book will change the way you think.

There is an interesting talk on Thinking Fast and Slow by Mr Kahneman at the The Long Now.

Seven Databases in Seven Weeks: A Guide to Modern Databases and the NoSQL Movement

Seven databases in seven weeksThe book Seven databases in seven weeks will take you on a tour visiting some of the hottest open source database today. This is typical software development reading.

It has a progressive style of offering insigts to databases and their capabilities. The open source databases covered are PostgreSQL, Riak, Apache HBase, MongoDB, Apache CouchDB, Neo4J, and Redis. These were chosen to span five database styles or genres: Relational, Key-Value, Columnar, Document and Graph.

This book is recommended for anyone looking for a solid introduction fo databases besides the traditional RDBMS. It will provide the knowledge you need to choose one database to suit your needs.

Book review: Do more with SOA integration

Book cover: Do more with SOA IntegrationRecently I read Do more with SOA integration that was published December 2011. This book is a mash-up of eight earlier published works from Packt, including Service Oriented Architecture: An Integration Blueprint, Oracle SOA Suite Developer’s Guide, WS-BPEL 2.0 for SOA Composite Applications with Oracle SOA Suite 11g, and SOA governance. More details on this title:

Target audience according to the publisher:

If you are a SOA architect or consultant who wants to extend your knowledge of SOA integration with the help of a wide variety of Packt books, particularly covering Oracle tools and products, then “Do more with SOA Integration: Best of Packt” is for you. You should have a good grasp of Service Oriented Architecture, but not necessarily of integration principles. Knowledge of vendor-specific tools would be an advantage but is not essential.

My thoughts

My assumption is that most people won’t read the around 700 pages of this book cover to cover. In my view it is a good reference book to get a solid introduction to SOA and integration in general.

To deepen you knowledge on real world scenario’s there a good examples eg given in the chapters on Extending enterprise application integration and Service oriented ERP integration. The first gives an example of of BPEL orchestrating various web service exposed on ERP systems (SAP, Siebel) using EAI (TIBCO, webMethods). This sample includes an example of centralized error handling. The latter shows an integration of PeolpleSoft CRM 8.9 and Oracle Applications 11g using BPEL 10g. The ideas and mechanismes of the integration will also hold in the 11g version.

Chapter 14 on SOA Integration a Scenario in detail, offers another example on how to use Oracle SOA technology (10g again) to integrate legacy systems into a more modern application landscape. It does a thorough job.

The chapter on Base Technologies has parts that are based on the Trivadis Integration Architecture Blueprint. Beside that it offers a good introduction on transactions, JCA, SCA and SDO. Their fundamentals are well explained without getting too technical. So should you be looking for coding examples on these topics, there are other great sources.

When reading about XML for integration I noticed that it answers questions we get from our customers on a regular basis like: How to design XSDs – XML Schema Definitions. Questions on when to use a type or an Element, chose targetNamespace or XMLSchema as the default namespace, the number of namespaces to use. These are all well adressed in the book.

Where on the other hand a complete view on the following statement could fill at least a whitepaper:

Adopt and develop design techniques, naming conventions, and other best practices similar to those used in object-oriented modelling to address the issues of reuse, modularization, and extensibility. Some of the common design techniques are discussed in the later sections.

The chapter on loose coupling offers an example of how to achieve this using the Oracle Service Bus. It is hard to overrate the importance of loose coupling since a lot of both the technical and the business advantage rely on whether or not this loose coupling is achieved.

Bottomline

As a reference this is a good starting point to learn about SOA and integration in general. It could be more consistent on some details and with the great BPEL and BPM tooling these days I wouldn’t implement processes in an ESB. Of course there is a good chapter (12) with an eaxmple of using both BPM and BPEL. As mentioned before it has some great illustrative examples of real world scenarios. The bottom line is that I would recommend this book to people looking for a reference on SOA and integration.

Cons:
Some text seems a little dated.

Pros:
Good description of SOA and integration in general; practical ; solid introduction on the XML stuff, transactions, JCA and SCA; nice real world integration examples.

Additional reviews

If you’re interested in other reviews on this book, visit the ADF Code Corner blog by Frank Nimphius, AMIS blog by Lucas Jellema, or this SOA / BPM on Fusion Middleware blog by Niall Commiskey.

Lean, agile and SOA reading list of 2011

Since this blog is also dedicated to sharing resources that are valueable to me I decided to share my reading list of 2011 with you.

Lean Integration: An Integration Factory Approach to Business Agility


A great best practices book on integration. The first part provides description of the business value of Lean. It introduces the core concepts. As a manager that doesn’t need all the details you could just read this part and you can get a good grasp of the ideas presented.

The second part translates the lean principles from the world of manufacturing to the world of systems integration. It has great case studies that shows the principles applied in a real world context.

Part three of the book provides a “how to” guide. This can be used as a reference and as such is a great desk-top reference manual. This book is great and a must read for all technology and business practitioners and innovators.

Web Service Contract Design and Versioning for SOA

Great reference (not a book that I read front to back) on Web Service Design from Thomas Erl and his co-authors. This book focuses exclusively on the contract part of the service. Due to the depth it is a extensive resource to use besides others. The book is filled with extensive examples on how to meet the goals of SOA properly using contract design.

Via the site of the publisher and on iTunes are additional service design podcasts by the authors of the book. Could be a great resource to start with.

The Back of the Napkin (Expanded Edition): Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures


This is a great book on problem solving, extremely useful and in a sense thought provoking. It structures problem-solving into a six by five visual codex. This makes sense; you can literally see the evolution of the thought processes and the development of the insights take shape through the pages. Fun read as well.

Scrum – additional resources

scrumThe basics of Scrum can be found in the Scrum Guide. Besides that there are loads of resources available on the subject. In this post I’ll share a few Scrum resources with you I recently discussed with my colleagues:

Besides these the online lean and Scrum resources library of one of my colleagues gives some other great hints. You might also like to read his selection of 10 from ‘Corps Business: The 30 Management Principles of the U.S. Marines’.

Oracle BPM Suite 11g Handbook and free resources

BPM Suite 11gRecently McGraw Hill published the Oracle Business Process Management Suite 11g Handbook. It is available on their site and at Amazon.com.

Here is the table of contents with the links to the free chapters:

    Part I: Introduction

  1. BPM – Background
  2. Standards in BPM
  3. BPM Suite 11g – Overview
  4. Part II: Mastering Oracle BPM 11g

  5. Quick Learners Guide to Oracle BPM 11g
  6. Business Process Modeling and Implementation using BPMN 2.0
  7. Mastering Business Rules
  8. Advanced Human Tasks
  9. Developing Rich User Interfaces for BPM with ADF
  10. Part III: Essentials of Oracle BPM Methodology

  11. Planning a BPM Adoption
  12. Strategic Analysis, Process Selection and Design
  13. Technical Design and Project Delivery Strategies

Book on Oracle SOA Suite 11g

SOA Suite 11g

SOA Suite 11g

Searching the web for more information on Fusion Middleware and Oracle SOA Suite 11g, I found that Getting started with Oracle SOA Suite 11g will be released within the coming weeks. This hands-on tutorial covers step-by-step material to train new and experienced SOA developers, in both the basics of SOA Suite, SCA and the more advanced aspects. More details on the book can be found here.
Expect a review of this book on this blog as soon as I get my hands on it.